Design and Marketing: The Critical Duo

The way we interact with our surroundings is defined, quite possibly, by its structure. Shapes, colors, words, sounds and other elements combine to create an environment that may well be hostile or friendly to us.

All space and objects we come into contact with is subject to a process that has led to this physical creation: design.

Daily, we hear this term applied to many industries, and for various purposes: graphic, textile, urban, architectural, industrial, interiors, editorial, advertising, digital, etc. It has so many meanings and interpretations, and, unfortunately has become a discipline somewhat misunderstood and underestimated. Not many people appreciate its true power, or better yet, its transcendence in our lives and in the business world.

All things we choose in our everyday (clothes, food, consumer goods, etc.), as well as for our big decisions (house, car, school, etc.) are always subject to a criteria of functionality and aesthetics, sometimes in different orders of priority. Thus creating within us a perception that may result in a purchase.

In marketing, design is critical to the success of a brand. From the design of a product: its packaging, presentation, logo, name and colors, to its pricing strategies, point of purchase display and advertising. Everything is conceived, planned, designed. Design must therefore provide a functional and aesthetic solution to a specific need on principles of simplicity, practicality and economy (entailing an efficient management of resources that comprise it, without desire to cheapen the concept).

A consistent design, from all angles, generates great power and value to brands; it projects a very strong cohesion, and its elements are not reduced just to visual elements. A company that displays a careful visual image, a product or service well-crafted, effective business communication, and consistent behavior of its employees or agents, has great opportunities and a huge advantage over their competitors.

If a brand’s advertising is flawless, it is possible to persuade a large number of people to buy it - but if its container is not ergonomically friendly or service lends itself so clumsy or hasty - perhaps it will discourage consumers from buying it a next time. If, however, the physical design of a product is outstanding, many people may not have a chance to try it if your advertising and communications is poorly designed.

The development of effective business design is built upon several disciplines that are complemented by a single purpose: marketing, semiotics, hues and chromes, typography, psychology, semantics, sociology, and so on. Those responsible for the design of a graphical solution, product, space or advertising message need to know this in order to create a strong and suitable concept.

According to several professional and remarkable designers, we can conclude that good design must comply with the characteristics below:

  • Good design is a concept, a story, something to say.
  • Designing communicates, not decorates.
  • Good design should be universal and timeless. Your message must be easily understood in different places and cultures. Moreover, it must strive to transcend time instead of becoming obsolete quickly.
  • Good design is versatile. Fits various means.
  • It is simple, clear and concise.
  • Good design is innovative. It surprises and calls the viewer's attention.
  • It helps us to understand a product. It communicates benefits perfectly.
  • It makes a product useful.
  • It watches the details.


One Response to "Design and Marketing: The Critical Duo"

  • […] Good design means good business and marketers know it. A well distributed and elegant cabin design, as well as a unique branded livery, can make the aircraft itself such a powerful tool to communicate, create brand awareness and seduce passengers. On the other hand, designing a sophisticated airport lounge and making the waiting process much more comfortable has given outstanding results to many airlines that realize the profitable benefit of great design. […]

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