Brazilian brands get ready to hit the field for this year’s World Cup

Brazil World Cup

The year 2014 represents one thing for the sports world: the FIFA World Cup. Whether you like or not, it's here, and in less than a few weeks it becomes real in Brazil. How does this worldwide phenomenon affect Brazilian products? How are advertisers supposed to behave and compete with international brands in this very crowded marketplace?

The FIFA World Cup moves extraordinary - as well as dubious - sums of money that range from infrastructure to ad campaigns. "Brazil expects to receive 500,000 foreign tourists and move tens of millions of Brazilians for the host cities." (Source: Ministry of Tourism)

Within this scenario, Brazilian brands are offered a unique opportunity of competing on the same arena with other major international brands. As a country, Brazil should export a comprehensive picture of modern, developed and creative nation. An image that relies heavily on a good performance of its national products, since the brand identity created for the 2014 World Cup had proven to be a colossal failure. A poorly structured logo, foolish typography and a mascot that became a joke, all seemed a random combination of elements without any previous planning.

World Cup logo

The branding of the 2014 World Cup consists in a random junction of elements without much planning.

Despite the not-so-great image of Brazilian marketing and branding, national products may still have a chance to change this paradigm. Here are some ideas as to how to make that happen.

1. Brazilian pride

The country's essence and fervor for the World Cup dictates a distinct set of factors within its global marketing: energy, passion and happiness, which are perhaps more important than leadership and quality. National brands should encourage  patriotism by creating motivational campaigns that take advantage of their market and extensive consumer knowledge. A Brazilian-to-Brazilian approach and message within campaigns will generate an inherent marketing advantage.

2. Keeping an eye on FIFA Partners

Something that is definitely worth watching out for are the actions executed by the six major international brands involved in the World Cup - Adidas, Coca-Cola, Hyundai, Kia, Emirates, Sony and Visa - who have paid sums as large as £230 million to FIFA for a four-year partnership. These brands will bring a lot of creativity and branding quality and will be present in all matters of the tournament. These advertisers will have access to more than 50% of the world population. 

 3. Joining in

Brands should improve and promote the consumer experience and become a part of the worldwide event through local and spontaneous activations. Social media (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, Youtube ...) are ideal platforms for Brazilians and foreigners to share their own experiences and interact with each other.

Brands could also integrate their efforts onto social and mobile platforms, paving the way for a more immediate and  tight-knit contact with the audience. 

Coca-Cola World Cup FIFA

 4. Adding value

Brands must find a way to incorporate themselves in the middle of the experience between fans and the sport without being invasive. Through this connection, they should strive to add value and continue a longterm relationship with consumers, not only during 2014, but until the next World Cup in 2018.

The tournament is ready and guaranteed to the public and the consumers; now the question that remains is whether it will get a taste of Brazil's victory.

 Brazil World Cup

Follow Giovanna Lettieri at EsttudioG.

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