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Tag Archives: Advertising

Our favorite Super Bowl Ads on Youtube Blitz

Year in and year out, the Super Bowl provides sports fans, viewers and advertisers one exciting and memorable night. 2014 was no different. The Seattle Seahawks conquered the Denver Broncos with an outstanding score of 43 - 8, considered by experts as the "greatest defensive performances in Super Bowl history against the greater offence in NFL history."  But we're not really here to talk about sports, are we?

Let's get to it. 

As ever, Super Bowl Sunday is the holiday of holidays for advertisers and footfall fans alike. With 30-second spots at $4 million a pop ( that's about $133,000 per second), the quest for advertising efficiency is at an all-time high. Just like last year, social media played an exciting role for the pre-game promotion and hype; a strategy that allowed brands to set the tone and engage with customers sooner. As Paul Fahri expressed, "A Super Bowl commercial is just the start of an advertiser’s advertising . . . about its Super Bowl advertising. The commercial is just the middle. Thanks to social media, companies engage in a buildup about their ads before the game, and most follow up afterward, too." The Super Bowl may have ended, but thanks to Youtube, it ads will still resonate.

Youtube Ad Blitz

Youtube has returned with its Ad Blitz featuring the list of Super Bowl spots, inviting us to watch, vote and share our favorite ads of the night. Honestly, I am loving the idea of having a Super Bowl "hub" on Youtube; everything in one place, perfectly organized. It offers brands a longevity to their Marketing efforts and gets people voting on what they really liked after watching it several times. And if Ad Blitz 2014 performs anywhere near what it did in 2013 - which offered a combined view of 110 million views, 1.3 million hours and 60 million daily impressions - we're talking about money well spent.

Youtube Ad Blitz

"The real contest at the big game is not fought in the field; the real contest is between advertisers and their commercials. And that commercial is fought - and won - on Youtube Ad Blitz." You got that right.

Go to Youtube and click VOTE under your favorite video. Simple.


 

The Business of Big Ideas: Ogilvy

Agency giant, Ogilvy, is no stranger to the subject of big ideas. 

In 1947, David Ogilvy, mastermind and founder of Ogilvy & Mather, set out to build one of the largest advertising networks in history. His audacity and success were only surpassed by a business acumen and ability to voice concepts that have served as inspiration and a guiding light for professionals in the field of advertising and marketing. When he spoke, we listened. And that we have done for over half a century.

Ogilvy founded his philosophy on three basic pillars: quality and diversity of the people, quality and class of the operation, and last but not least, belief in brands. From here stems that age-long conviction of the development and cultivation of the intangible aspects that make companies (and those responsible for it) unique. "Our history is the evolution of one man's thoughts, talents, and work ethic translated into a company culture, a defining business strategy, a destiny." We must make advertising that sells, but first, make advertising that builds brands. 

So when it comes to ideas worth spreading, what could be better than to share them through social media? The team at Ogilvy has done a great job in creating a platform that both informs and celebrates the passion for ideas set forth by none other than its brilliant founder. For the past year, I've been fascinated with amazing entries featuring infographics, quotes, rankings and facts on the subject of business, advertising, brands, and life.

In keeping with the celebration of knowledge, here are 20 of my most favorite posts from Ogilvy & Mather's Facebook page:

Ogilvy 22

Ogilvy 1

Ogilvy 2

Ogilvy 3

Ogilvy 4

Ogilvy 5

Ogilvy 6

Ogilvy 7

Ogilvy 8

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Ogilvy 11

Ogilvy 12

Ogilvy 15

Ogilvy 16

 Ogilvy 16

Ogilvy 17

Ogilvy 19 Ogilvy 20

Ogilvy 23

 

Google captures the spirit of ‘search’ in its new Zeitgeist video

There is no greater moment in advertising than that in which the spirit of a brand is linked to the spirit of humanity.

Since 2010, Google has provided a snapshot of the world's most important events through its Zeitgeist video. From our biggest achievements to our most perilous catastrophes, it reflects what touched us and shaped us during the course of 365 days.

This year's top trends can be found on their website under an array of categories - people, events, consumer electronics, hashtags, etc. - all of which result in a memorable and beautiful video. (see below)

Google Zeitgeist 2013

Google Zeitgeist - United States: 


Google Zeitgeist - France:


Google Zeitgeist - Japan:


Google Zeitgeist- Germany:


 

Previous years:

"Google Zeitgeist 2010: A Year in Review." 

"Google Zeitgeist 2011: How the World Searched." 

"Google Zeitgeist 2012: The World's Biggest Moments."

Success stories from the 2013 National Congress of Digital Marketing

Held in the Chapultepec Cultural Forum of Mexico City, this year's National Congress of Digital Marketing  gathered hundreds of marketing professionals, students, agencies and all those who are somehow involved in this exciting discipline. 

Industry's prominent speakers shared their opinions, advices, best practices and case studies in order to illustrate a varied, complete and interesting range of cutting-edge issues that can not be ignored by marketers and brands in the modern business environment.

Here are some succesfully performed international campaigns that were shared by the speakers, as good examples and inspiration for our daily work in the world of digital marketing.

Enjoy!

Starbucks: Tweet a Coffee


Burger King: Whopper Sacrifice


Xbox: Kinect Effect


Look at this Instagram: Nickelback Parody


Big Data for Smarter Customer Experience


Volkswagen search engine ad: Like a boss


Recife: Immortal Fans


Oreo: 100th birthday


 Betty White's  SNL monologue on Facebook


 

Steve Jobs: The Man Behind the Brand

On the month that marks the second anniversary since Steve Jobs' passing, blogger Edgar Estévez reflects on the influence and legacy Apple's main man left to the marketing world...  

Young Steve Jobs

An entrepreneur, an innovator, an inventor, a visionary…  a genius. These are just some of the adjectives used to describe Steve Jobs, a man whose path was never predictable. He was given up for adoption at birth, he dropped out of college after only one semester and at the age of 20 co-founded Apple, currently one of the most valuable companies in the world.

There is no doubt that Steve Jobs created a revolution. As one of the top pioneers on the personal computer and electronics field, his impeccable taste and sense of style made him push all market boundaries, transforming one industry after another - from computers, to smart phones, to music and even animated films.

It’s been two years since he passed away and we still remember him as the very soul of the organization he helped create. His aggressive and demanding personality made him a perfectionist, always aspiring to be one step ahead of the industry and setting the market trends in innovation and design. But most importantly, he impregnated his passion for simplicity and top-notch quality into the company’s organizational culture, making this one of the key components of Apple’s sustaining performance and competitive advantage - percieved upon entering any Apple store in the world or simply by opening the box of any Apple product for the first time… It’s almost like a ritual!

As a marketer, Steve Jobs was a natural. He was driven by his obsession and love for his products, and made it a personal mission to have an impact in people’s lives. Not only did he invent great things, he also made the consumers feel emotionally attached to the brand at the point of turning them into passionate advocates of Apple. They don't think of themselves as consumers, but in turn members of a movement, a mission, something larger than themselves. He helped build mystery and expectation around product launches, always generating buzz and suspense before unveiling some amazing new gadget, making consumers and specially the competition go mad with speculation.  Jobs was also not afraid to go big, as pointed out on hubspot.com, and one great example was the widely known 1984 “Think Different” commercial for the new Macintosh, where he hired Ridley Scott, director of Alien and Blade Runner, and spent around $1.7 million ($3.4 million today) between producing the ad and running it one time during the Super Bowl. This was a huge risk for the company, especially since it wasn't clear that the ad would succeed, but it paid off. The ad generated as much coverage as the Macintosh itself.

No doubt that Steve Jobs is a tough act to follow and the company is not only facing  new challenges in the market but also trying to continue his legacy. So, how is Apple doing today? According to a study conducted by Interbrand Corp. on the Top 100 brands this past September, Apple has unseated Coca-Cola as the world’s No. 1 brand with a brand value of $98.3 billion, 28% more than last year. 

Still, some say that the brand is losing its magic. Some of the latest product innovation hasn’t raised the bar high enough for competitors and for consumers, who are always expecting big things from Apple. Many of the brand’s major products are facing increased competition from Samsung’s top-selling Galaxy phones, Amazon’s Kindle tablet reader and Spotify’s music service - and still the company keeps innovating around the same things - which is probably not innovating at all. The brand may be loosing its momentum, but they still have time to turn things around. After all, Apple is a very strong brand and the most profitable technology company there is, generating $41.7 billion last year. And even more importantly, they still have the consumer’s trust, since the popular perception is that “Apple could do no wrong”.

Most recently, the company appointed former Burberry CEO Angela Ahrendts as their new SVP of Retail and Online Stores, which many industry experts are saying is one of the company’s best decisions so far, since she is likely to bring a fresh leadership focus to Apple and complement well with current CEO Tim Cook to bring the brand up to the next level with breakthrough innovative products in new categories, allowing Apple to become the outstanding company of this decade. 

 Before you finish reading I wanted to leave you with the 10 things I have personally learned from Steve Jobs as a marketer myself. Additionally, here's a small fragment from a PBS documentary of 1994, which for me, perfectly reflects the way he saw and lived his life. Enjoy!

10 things I’ve learned from Steve Jobs as a marketer:

  1. Innovate.
  2. Time to market is crucial.
  3. Simple is always better.
  4. Failure is part of the process. The most important thing is knowing how to stand up again.
  5. Tenacity and hard work always pays off.
  6. Be curious.
  7. Stay focused.
  8. Pay attention to details.
  9. It’s ok to go a little crazy sometimes.
  10. Don’t be afraid to think different.

Steve Jobs on 'One Last Thing', a PBS documentary: 


“ When you grow up you tend to get told the world is the way it is and your life is just to live your life inside the world. Try not to bash into the walls too much. Try to have a nice family life, have fun, save a little money.

That’s a very limited life. Life can be much broader once you discover one simple fact, and that is - everything around you that you call life, was made up by people that were no smarter than you. And you can change it, you can influence it, you can build your own things that other people can use.

The minute that you understand that you can poke life and actually something will, you know if you push in, something will pop out the other side, that you can change it, you can mold it. That’s maybe the most important thing. It’s to shake off this erroneous notion that life is there and you’re just gonna live in it, versus embrace it, change it, improve it, make your mark upon it.

I think that’s very important and however you learn that, once you learn it, you’ll want to change life and make it better, cause it’s kind of messed up, in a lot of ways. Once you learn that, you’ll never be the same again."